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Since 1959, the US Air Force has been using the AR-7 as a survival rifle for pilots.   We loved the idea behind the AR-7 so we decided to put it through the paces at SurvivalCache to see if it would live up to the term “Survival Rifle”…and it did. Quick Navigation The AR-7 Shooting: SurvivalCache Video Review of the AR-7 Features: Overall: Changes The AR-7 Let me start off by saying that the AR-7 by Henry Repeating Arms would not be my first choice of a SHTF survival gun.

Survival Gear Review: Henry US Survival AR-7 Rifle

Survival Gear Review: Henry US Survival AR-7 RifleSince 1959, the US Air Force has been using the AR-7 as a survival rifle for pilots.  We loved the idea behind the AR-7 so we decided to put it through the paces at SurvivalCache to see if it would live up to the term “Survival Rifle”…and it did. Quick Navigation The AR-7 Shooting: SurvivalCache Video Review of the AR-7 Features: Overall: Changes The AR-7 Let me start off by saying that the AR-7 by Henry Repeating Arms would not be my first choice of a SHTF survival gun.  I would probably lean toward an AR-15, AK-47, Glock 17, or a 12 gauge shotgun.  But I don’t think the AR-7 fits into the typical “SHTF Bug Out Weapon” category.  The AR-7’s sweet spot is really as an emergency survival rifle, not to be confused with a SHTF rifle.  If you find yourself backpacking over long stretches wilderness, on a bush plane in Alaska or Canada, or on long road trips in a car or truck, then you are talking about the AR-7’s sweet spot.  At only 3.5 lbs, the AR-7 is a purpose built survival rifle. The first thing I noticed was the tough exterior of the Henry’s stock.  Made from ABS plastic , which has the important mechanical property of being impact resistance and known for toughness, this stock felt like it was made to survive.  The next thing that I really liked was the overall length of the survival rifle when it is disassembled and all pieces were stowed in the butt stock.  At only 16.5 inches, this rifle could easily find it’s way into the truck of my car next to my “Get Home Bag.” The assembly of the rifle was very intuitive and I quickly assembled it even before reading the directions.  I went back over the directions to make sure I did not miss anything before firing.  Once the AR-7 survival rifle was assembled, it handled very nicely and the ergonomics were great considering I was holding a rifle that was built to be tough, light and assembled very quickly in an emergency.  The 8 round magazine provides a little bit of comfort in a survival scenario, there is something about being able to quickly fire off 8 rounds accurately that is reassuring to me.  I also like the fact that you have an extra magazine (8 rounds) which you can keep secure in the butt stock or in your pocket.  When it comes to survival more is sometimes better. When I first fired the AR-7 I noticed that both my hands found natural positions on the rifle which felt very good.  Although it  was not the traditional way I would hold a rifle, my supporting hand quickly found a good spot along the magazine well.  Another cool survival feature about the AR-7  is that the front sight post is bright blaze orange.  This was ideal for quickly acquiring a target in all conditions.  With the rest of the rifle colored black (barrel, upper receiver, and stock), the orange front site post really stood out when looking through the rear sight peep site. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA Shooting: If you have shot a .22 LR before then this rifle is no different.  There is very little recoil and the report of the rifle was minimal.  In a survival situation the low recoil could come in handy if you had to put multiple rounds into the same target quickly. I shot through 10 magazines of ammo right out of the box with no malfunctions, not bad. SurvivalCache Video Review of the AR-7 Features: Action Type: Semi-automatic Caliber: .22 LR Capacity: 8 round magazine (comes with 2 magazines) Length: 35″ assembled – 16.5″ when stowed Weight: 3.5 lbs. Stock: ABS Plastic Sights: Adjustable rear, blade front (bright orange) Finish: Teflon coated receiver and coated steel barrel Country: Made in the USA M.S.R.P. $275.00 Overall: I was pleasantly surprised by this rifle and with features like a waterproof stock and the ability to float, it is hard to beat the Henry AR-7 Survival Rifle in it’s sweet spot which is survival.  With the low cost of the rifle ($200 to $275) and all of its features, you can see how this rifle could find its way into your car survival kit .  Put it in the trunk, sealed in a Loksak Loksak bag with a desiccant .  Store some extra gun lube and 500 rounds of .22 LR and you are prepared for emergencies for a little over $200. Changes The only thing that I noticed was that the stock seemed to have a lot of extra space in it.  If I was going to make changes to the AR-7, I would make the magazines 16 rounds each for a total of 32 rounds.  I would also add a fire starter and a small pocket knife to the butt stock compartment.  There seems to be enough space but I am no engineer, overall I really enjoyed the survival rifle and recommend it if it fits into your plan. Video by: SurvivalCache.com Team Photos by: "Henry Repeating Arms" The SurvivalCache.com Team Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: Kel-Tec RFB Ruger 10/22 Takedown: Survival Rifle Review "Survival Gear Review" : PWS MK214 Battle Rifle Survival Gear Review: Benjamin Trail NP2 Air Rifle

Best .30-30 Ammo: Harvesting Deer Since 1895

Best .30-30 Ammo: Harvesting Deer Since 1895

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s One-hundred twenty-three years ago the .30-30 Winchester was launched. In August of 1895, the first Model 1894 Winchester rifle appeared in the Winchester catalog.  And the rest, as they say, is history. Winchester Model 94 in .30-30 The .30-30 was the first commercially available small-bore rifle cartridge in the US designed for use with smokeless powder.  By today’s standards, the .30-30 should have faded from the shooting scene long ago. Table of Contents Loading... Background Compared to cartridges like the popular 6.5 Creedmoor and the .30-06 and the . 300 Winchester Magnum , the 30-30 pales in comparison when we look at the trajectory, velocity, and downrange power. However, the 30-30 lives on and in recent surveys looking at sales of centerfire rifle cartridges the .30-30 still rank number four in annual sales. How can that be?  The ‘94 Winchester set the stage long ago for lightweight and handy rifles.  With the then new .30-30 cartridge hunters had a quick-handling rifle with adequate power for any deer or black bear inside of 150 yards. With only 10 foot-pounds of felt recoil, the handy little .30-30 is an ideal way to introduce young shooters to the world of centerfire rifles. The perfect combination! Arguably, the two most popular rifles for the .30-30 are the Winchester Model 94 and the Marlin 336 . Marlin 336 Lever-Action Rifle 515 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 515 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I love packing my Model ‘94 Trapper in the whitetail woods of northeast Washington.  At only six pounds I can carry it all day and know I am adequately armed for any opportunity at a whitetail, black bear or mountain lion that may occur. Mountain lion, bad kitty! However, I still need a couple more .30-30’s in my accumulation;  a Marlin 336CS has long been on my list and someday I’ll find the right one. I’d also like to delve into the world of specialty handguns and the .30-30 in Thompson Center Contender with a Super 14 barrel seems like just the ticket for sniping at ground squirrels, coyotes, deer and maybe even antelope. So what kind of ammo is available today to feed a .30-30 for sportsmen? .30-30 Ammo Keep in mind that all ammo that is being fed from a tubular magazine needs to be flat or round-nose to prevent detonation in the magazine tube due to recoil. The exception is with Hornady’s LeverEvolution Flex Tip ammo and if you single load spitzer bullets. For the most part, .30-30 ammo is available in 150- and 170-grain round-nose and flat-nose loads.  There are a few exceptions and hand loaders will find there are some options available for single loaded and lightweight plinking bullets. Best .30-30 Factory Ammunition for Hunting 1. Remington CORE-LOKT Walk into any rural hardware store or mini-mart and you are likely to spot a green and yellow box of Remington .30-30 ammo on the shelf. Gold Standard for "Do-It-All" .30-30 Remington Core-Lokt .30-30 Ammo 17.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 17.75 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Available in 150- and 170-grain CORE-LOKT Soft Point bullets this ammo will serve you well for any deer or bear hunting trip you take with your trusty .30-30.  These bullets are designed for uniform expansion and weight retention. 2. Winchester Super-X Power Point Like the Remington ammunition above, the Super-X offering from Winchester is likely to be found just about everywhere you can purchase centerfire rifle ammo. Winchester Super-X .30-30 17.50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 17.50 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Super-X ammunition is available in 150 and 170-grain loads and has been helping hunters harvest deer, bear, and other big game since 1922. 3. Winchester Power-Max Bonded This load features a protected hollow point and bonded construction.  With the bonding, the bullet core and jacket stay together to provide deep penetration and controlled expansion. Winchester Power Max Bonded .30-30 22 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 22 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing These cartridges are available in 150- and 170-grain loads and are specially designed with the deer hunter in mind. 4. Hornady FTX LEVERevolution This ammunition is loaded with the Hornady 160 grain Flex Tip (FTX) bullet.  The bullet has a patented flexible tip that allows a spitzer-type bullet to be used in tubular magazines. Best Hunting & Self-Defense .30-30 Ammo Hornady LeverEvolution .30-30 22.50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 22.50 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The FTX bullet allows up to 250 feet per second more velocity than the traditional round or flat-nose bullets we have been discussing.  With increased velocity comes a flatter trajectory and more downrange energy. Hornady’s website indicates the 160-grain FTX is suitable for up to elk-size game.  As always, correct shot placement is key. Aim for the heart and lungs! 5. Federal Fusion Federal .30-30 ammo is available in 150 and 170-grain loads.  The Fusion ammo features an electrochemically bonded jacket and core. Federal Fusion .30-30 Bonded BT Ammo 19 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 19 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing In addition, the bullet is a boat-tail design to provide greater accuracy at all ranges.  The fusion offers extreme expansion and great weight retention. What’s your take on the Fusion? Readers' Ratings 4.96/5 (293) Your Rating? Plinking and Long Range Shooting All of the ammunition listed above would work just fine for hunting deer, black bear, hogs, and in the right circumstances, game as large as elk and moose. Because the .30-30 is such a light recoiling cartridge, you may find yourself just plinking or even doing a little ground squirrel sniping or coyote hunting with your favorite lever gun.  The 150-grain offerings will work just fine and you’ll learn about longer-range trajectory with your hunting rifle. Gold Standard for "Do-It-All" .30-30 Remington Core-Lokt .30-30 Ammo 17.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 17.75 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Things begin to get interesting if you are a handloader.  Pick something like a Nosler Ballistic Tip 125- grain bullet.  Then dive into the reloading manual and load up some rounds found in the handgun section. You will have to single load these rounds as they are a spitzer design and have a hard polymer tip.  Now you have a much more aerodynamic bullet for reaching out a bit further. On the Leverguns.com site, you can find load info with Hornady 100-grain varmint bullets with muzzle velocities approaching 3,000 feet per second .  With a zero of three inches high at 100 yards, your lever gun is now on at 300 yards and only 20 inches low at 400 yards. Who says that long-range shooting isn’t possible with an old-fashioned lever gun? If you push the same 100-grain plinking bullet at around 2,000 feet per second you now have a great round with very little recoil for teaching new shooters. Parting Shots The .30-30 can be a very accurate cartridge in rifles that are in good condition.  My little ‘94 Trapper easily put 3 shots in one hole when I was preparing for a mountain lion hunt in 2014. .30-30 Accuracy My gun prefers 150-grain round-nose bullets.  At 100 yards the rifle is capable of sub-MOA groups, I just don’t know if my eyes are that good anymore. In my humble opinion, everyone should have a lever action .30-30 in their collection.  The guns are fun, accurate and capable of putting meat in the freezer year after year. If you want more lever-action awesomeness, you’ll want to read about the Henry Lever-Action rifles that we’ve reviewed. Tell us about your favorite loads and experience with your .30-30! Have many deer have you taken with it? Plan on using it on the next season’s hunt? Check out more caliber load suggestions in our Ammo & Reloading section.

Handguns: What Should You Do With Your Thumb?

Handguns: What Should You Do With Your Thumb?

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d0f61ffb_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d0f61ffb_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The shooting hand's thumb is often ignored, but where it's placed is as important as the trigger finger. Where should your strong hand's thumb go? Often forgotten, the shooting hand's thumb placement is as important as the trigger finger's indexing. On guns with thumb safeties, it should rest on top of the safety to reduce risk of engagement. Upon holstering, you should reverse the thumb's position to engage the safety. To prevent a striker-fired handgun from coming out of battery when holstering, the thumb should be on the rear of the slide. Rightly so, there’s a lot of discussion about what you should do with your trigger finger when you’re shooting or not shooting. However, we rarely hear talk about what you should do with your thumb — the one on your shooting hand. Its positioning is just as important. When firing a handgun with a manual thumb safety, rest your thumb on top of the safety. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! If you’re shooting a handgun with a thumb safety, your thumb should be resting on top of the safety while you’re shooting. This circumvents the possibility of the safety being inadvertently engaged. I say resting because pressure can interfere with shot placement. When you holster a handgun with a thumb safety that locks the slide — like on a 1911 or Browning Hi Power — your thumb should be under the safety, applying pressure up. This will most likely prevent you from negligently shooting yourself, should you be stupid enough to leave your finger on the trigger while holstering . Related GunDigest Articles Concealed Carry: Concealing A Single-Action Revolver Concealed Carry: Immersive Defensive Firearms Training How Good Can Factory Ammunition Get?

7 States with the Strictest Gun Laws

7 States with the Strictest Gun Laws

With mass shootings on the rise, several states have begun establishing stricter gun laws. Some have banned assault rifles and assault handguns. A few states also limit the number of rounds a magazine can hold. Below we have listed the top seven states with strictest gun laws in place. Anyone gun owner who plans on traveling to another state, regardless of how short the visit is, must be aware of that state’s gun laws to stay out of trouble. 1. California California requires universal background checks on anyone who wants to buy a gun. The state prohibits domestic violence offenders and high risk individuals from purchasing guns. High capacity magazines and assault weapons are also banned in California. Another strict rule of buying firearms there is you need to go through a California-licensed dealer. This state often ranks first on states with strictest gun laws lists. 2. Massachusetts Massachusetts is one of the states with strictest gun laws because they make the process of obtaining firearms and related supplies complex. You need to have a specific card or license to buy a certain type of gun or accessory. Examples include handguns, rifles, shotguns, large capacity feeding devices, ammunition, and large capacity firearms. If you are a non-resident visiting Massachusetts, you must apply for a temporary license to bring a gun. Although 24 states honor a Massachusetts permit, the state doesn’t honor any permits aside from its own. 3. New Jersey As a state that limits magazines to 15 rounds, New Jersey is definitely one of the top states with strictest gun laws. Lawmakers want to reduce it to 10 rounds, so the law may change after the time of this writing. In order to possess a handgun, including an antique handgun, you need to have a permit to carry. For rifles and shotguns, you need to have a firearms purchaser identification card (FID). Open carry isn’t allowed in New Jersey, but you can carry a gun on your person inside a liquor establishment. Similar to Massachusetts, New Jersey doesn’t recognize carry permits from any other state. 24 states honor a New Jersey carry permit. 4. Maryland Maryland limits handgun purchases to one per month. as many states with strictest gun laws do. You need to be 21 or older to buy a gun in this state. The law requires child safety locks on all guns. A permit is required to purchase handguns. You must also give your fingerprints, undergo a background check, and take training. Active duty and retired military are allowed to obtain a gun without a handgun qualification license. Active and retired law enforcement with department credentials are also exempt from needing a handgun qualification license. Anyone who has committed a Maryland-classified felony, conspiracy to commit a felony, or crime of violence is banned from owning firearms. Habitual drunkards and drug addicts can’t own a firearm either. 5. Illinois In Illinois, you must show your firearm’s owner’s identification card (FOID) before purchasing ammunition or firearms. The law requires sellers to wait 72 hours before delivering a handgun to the buyer. For rifles and shotguns, the seller must wait 24 hours before delivery. A little more lenient than New Jersey and Massachusetts, Illinois allows non-residents to carry a concealed firearm in their vehicle if they have a carry permit in their home states. Open carry isn’t legal in Illinois for anyone. You must keep your firearm concealed. 6. Connecticut Connecticut has many of the same strict gun laws as California. The state banned assault rifles after the Sandy Hook tragedy that occurred in December 2012 in Newton. Adam Lanza, a 20 year old, shot his mother at their home and then shot 26 people at an elementary school. He committed suicide before he could be arrested. Connecticut, however, still allows concealed carry as well as vehicle and open carry. Some zones are gun-free zones, so make sure you check before bringing a gun with you. 7. Colorado Although assault weapons are legal at the time of this writing in Colorado, they are one of the states with strictest gun laws. Colorado doesn’t have “stand your ground” as some of the lenient states do. But the state allows you to carry a gun on your person or vehicle for lawful protection of yourself, other people, and property. Although you can have a loaded handgun in your vehicle, you aren’t allowed to carry a loaded long gun in your vehicle. Convicted felons, people who are on probation, and juveniles who committed a crime that would count as a felony if they were an adult are banned from gun ownership in Colorado. Summing Up The seven states listed above are easily considered having the strictest gun laws. Many of them have limits on how many firearms you can buy each month. Some even restrict magazine round count. As always, you should check the gun laws of any state you travel or move to when you plan on bringing a gun with you, even if it’s an antique one. For those who are interested in living in a state with tough gun laws, then the seven above are some of your top choices.

The 4 Best Scopes for Scar 17 – Optic Reviews 2020 Photo by Keary O. / CC BY The Scar 17 is one of the most modern, heavy hitting battle rifles out there. Designed by FN and marketed to the Special Operation community, the SCAR 17 has the ergonomics of an assault rifle but with the powerful .308 chambering. Because the Scar 17 is a precise rifle, it needs a good quality optic to take advantage of its max range. The 7.62 NATO/ .308 Winchester round is a heavyweight quite unlike the dainty 5.56mm. This means any optic topping the Scar 17 needs to be strong and resistant to recoil. A good optic needs to compliment the Scar and take advantage of its seamless ability to transition from a designated marksman rifle to a hard hitting close-quarters battle weapon. Here, in our humble opinion, are the 4 best Scopes for Scar 17 rifles: Trijicon ACOG BR .308 Trijicon TA11J-308 ACOG 3.5x35mm Dual Illuminatedx 40mm, Red Crosshair .308 Ballistic Reticle with TA51 Mount, Black Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 15:45 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. If money were no object, this is the best scope for Scar 17 period. The Trijicon ACOG is well known for its military use on standard M4 and M16 rifles. However, these rifles are chambered in the 5.56mm, and the reticle and bullet drop compensator is ineffective on the .308 round. A Scar 17 needs the ACOG BR .308 (the BR stands for ballistic reticle). This ACOG by Trijicon is specifically tailored for the .308 round and takes bullet drop into account. This is in the form of a BDC that shows the user where the exact holdover is for certain ranges. The Trijicon ACOG ( see full specs ) has a 3.5x level of magnification and a 35mm objective lens. The model comes with either a green or red reticle that is illuminated but completely battery free. The scope uses a combination of tritium and fiber optics to absorb light and provide internal illumination. The optic is nearly a pound and 8 inches in length so it’s no slouch in the size department. However, the Trijicon ACOG optics are known for their last lasting durability and bulletproof strength. The ACOG brand has proven itself through two wars and a decade of experience. This is an optic even a Marine can’t break. The Trijicon ACOG compliments a Scar 17 very well and allows the rifle to act as both a close quarters and ranged battle rifle. Rock River LAR 8 - 300 yd steel - Trijicon ACOG (TA11J-308) Watch this video on YouTube

Ranking The 10 Best Trail Cameras of 2020

A good trail camera comes in a rugged and, ideally, weatherproof design that’s capable of extended and unmanned use in the outdoors. It will give you clear images of the different game in your area that will help you identify and track the species you’re looking for. Most cameras automatically take a picture when they sense motion in their area, but there are a lot of other features that separate good cameras from great ones. Our list of the 10 Best Trail Cameras will help you weed out the competition and settle on one that’ll truly suit your intended purpose. Also, be sure to check out our Buyer’s Guide for precise information on how to choose a trail camera. 1. Foxelli Trail Camera Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This camera provides excellent 12-megapixel photos and 1080P Full HD videos, with sound, up to 10 minutes long. It’s great for anyone who wants to ‘set and forget’ because set up is quick and easy and it can be conveniently mounted to a tree with the included strap. The "Foxelli Trail Camera" also features a 120-degree wide angle lens for a larger shooting scope. It is equipped with a 2.4-inch LCD monitor that allows you to preview photos and videos, as well as easily target the camera’s viewing area. It’s also motion activated with a 65-foot detection range. 2. Browning Strike Force 850 HD Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This 16-megapixel game camera is the best covert camera in the smallest case size. This camera provides clear images with dimensions of 4.5” x 3.25” x 2.5” and boasts a detection range of 80 feet. It also has a 0.4-second trigger speed and a programmable picture delay that can be set anywhere from 5 seconds to 60 minutes. The "Browning Strike Force" 850 HD is easy to use and comes with a 120-foot flash range. It also boasts a 0.8 second recovery time and is capable of shooting up to 8 rapid-fire images or 8 multi-shot images when motion is detected in its vicinity. 3. Amcrest ATC-1201 Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The Amcrest ATC-1201 is a great “set and forget” trail camera with incredibly low visibility. It blends right into its surroundings and comes with a 12-megapixel camera that captures high-definition, full-color images, and 1920 x 1080P video. This trail camera also contains a long night vision range that can sense motion and automatically capture movement up to 65 feet away. It also boasts a wide, 100-degree PIR ( 1 ) field of view and up to three total months of standby battery life. 4. Stealth Cam P12 Click here for the lowest price on Amazon Stealth Cam prides itself on its combination of performance and affordability, and their P12 camera is an excellent option for scouting. It contains a 6-megapixel camera with a 50-foot range and it’s also capable of capturing videos up to 15 seconds in length. A durable, digital 3D camouflage housing that contains an external LCD display and Test Mode with a low battery indicator protects this trail camera. All photos and videos are stamped with time, date, and moon phase, and this camera features a programmable burst mode that can capture 1 to 6 images per triggering. 5. Primos Truth Cam 35 Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This trail camera is a great option for anyone that’s inexperienced with game cameras because it comes with easy-to-understand instructions printed right on the camera door for easy reference. It also allows for a selection of the number of active LEDs, for more night range or battery life. The Primos Truth Cam 35 contains a 3-megapixel camera with a 40-foot extended range and a total of 35 LEDs. It boasts a 1.5-second trigger speed and a long-lasting battery life that runs on 4D batteries. It also features a molded security cable hole through the case to aid in theft prevention. 6. Bushnell 16MP Trophy Cam Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The Bushnell Trophy Cam is a true, four-season scouting camera with a true one-year battery life. It contains a 16-megapixel camera that provides images in high-quality, full-color resolution and it captures videos in 1280x720p resolution. This trail camera also offers a 0.3-second trigger speed and its adjustable settings allow you to capture one to three images per trigger or anywhere from five to 60 seconds of video at a given time. It also features a recovery rate of less than one second and a new “Auto Exposure” feature for better light detection to eliminate whiteouts. 7. Moultrie M-999i Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The Moultrie brand is one of the world’s highest-selling brands of game cameras and feeders. They offer excellent, reliable, and easy-to-use cameras designed by hunters, for hunters. This camera offers a 20-megapixel sensor and a high-quality lens for crystal clear images. The Moultrie M-999i offers a trigger speed of fewer than 0.5 seconds and a flash range of 70 feet. It can capture full HD video with 1080px resolution and clear sound. It also features a built-in, 2” TFT ( 2 ) color screen to give you the ability to check images directly on the camera and position the camera perfectly. 8. Bestguarder HD IP66 Click here for the lowest price on Amazon A perfect camera for animal hunting, trail game, garden and ecological monitoring, home surveillance, and security, this 12-megapixel camera captures high-quality, full-color resolution images and 1920x1080p full HD video. It also contains an audio record programmable length from 5 to 90 seconds. The Bestguarder HD IP66 trail camera contains 36pcs no-glow IR LEDs that allow it to take full-color photos and videos in daytime and black and white photos and videos at night at distances up to 75 feet. Each image taken by this camera can be stamped with a variety of useful information, including barometric pressure, GPS Geotag, moon phase, temperature, time, date, and camera ID. 9. Stealth Cam No-Glo Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This trail camera contains a 14-megapixel lens with four resolution settings: 14MP, 8MP, 6MP, and 2MP HD video with sound. The camera’s 45 no-glow infrared emitters give it a 100-foot flash range and make it a perfect option for low-light performance and quick movement capture. The Stealth Cam No-Glo has a camouflage exterior and an included tree strap to secure in your desired location. The camera operates on 8 AA batteries and includes an energy-efficient design for longer battery life. It also features a sub-0.5-second trigger for both day and night pics and video. 10. Moultrie Game Spy Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The Moultrie Game Spy trail camera is built on simplicity and reliability and it’s a great way to keep a covert, watchful eye on the wild game throughout your land during every season. This camera offers a 6-megapixel image resolution for sharp photos. It also contains long-range infrared flash technology and a tough, tree bark-textured case for wireless game management. It captures clear images during day and night with a flash range of up to 35 feet. It also features the ability to capture 480px video and contains a trigger speed of fewer than 2.5 seconds. — Buyer’s Guide The two major uses for trail cameras these days are game scouting and home security. Precise information about the type of animals frequenting a given area can be invaluable to hunters. For homeowners, a couple well-positioned cameras can be much cheaper than a full home-security system, and often prove to be just as effective. Advances in technology have led to a wide variety of trail cameras on the market. Some are designed for a specific purpose and some are made for general use. To aid in your selection, this Buyer’s Guide will focus on some of the most important factors to consider when buying a new trail camera. Photo Specs There are a lot of terms thrown around to describe the effectiveness of a given camera. Megapixels is one of the most popular. It’s important to understand that more megapixels generally means sharper images. However, super-high megapixels are only really necessary if you’re using a trail camera for outdoor photography. You’ll still get a solid, usable image with a lower megapixel count. Features like Burst Mode and Time-lapse Mode can be incredibly useful additions to a good trail camera. The former takes multiple pictures in a row very quickly. This will help you capture even the fastest animals. The latter takes pictures at set intervals. For hunters, this will allow you to see when certain quarry enters your chosen spot, where they came from, how long they linger, and which direction it leaves. Time and date stamps are also an essential feature in a good trail camera. For hunters, this will help you dial in the perfect time to head out in search of your preferred game. If you’re using the camera for home security, it can also be critical in assisting law enforcement in the case of a home invasion. Video Capability Video is another important and useful feature of many trail cameras. When considering a given camera’s video capability, the most important terms include resolution, duration, audio, time-lapse video mode, and hybrid mode. Resolution is how crisp your image will be. Much like megapixels, a higher resolution means a sharper video. Video duration is a key consideration because it can be quite variable. Most cameras will allow you to choose the length of video you want to be recorded, but their capability of total length can range anywhere from 3 to 300 seconds. Audio is a component that may not be necessary if tracking game, but it will be quite handy if using a camera for home security. Time-lapse video mode gives you the ability to record short videos at set time intervals. It’s important to recognize the Photo Timelapse and Video Timelapse are two distinct features. Some models even feature a ‘hybrid mode’ that takes both a photo and a short video. We do, however, have a final word of warning when it comes to video. Video recording tends to require a ton of battery power and can quickly drain batteries at a much faster rate than taking still images. This is especially true at night, so be careful and sparing in your use of a trail camera’s video capabilities. Detection Range Detection range is simply the distance a subject can be and still trigger the camera to capture a photo. When choosing a trail camera, it’s important to understand that more isn’t always better. Yes, a longer detection range is great for covering more ground and surveying a large field for wildlife. However, short detection ranges have a use too. Game trails or more enclosed, wooded areas don’t really require an incredibly long detection range. In these cases, a shorter detection range can actually lead to clearer, better images. Viewing When it comes to viewing your photos and videos, there are three main options: an integrated viewing screen, no screen, and wireless download. An integrated viewing screen will allow you to flip through footage much as you’d flip through photos on a digital camera. They can be small and difficult to see, but they’re also handy when making sure that the camera is placed in the exact direction you desire. Some trail cameras offer no screen at all. These cameras require that you remove the external SD card and plug it into a computer or phone to view photos and videos. Many smartphones can now handle a special adapter that allows you to view the contents of an SD card while still in the field. Many higher-end models have started to incorporate wireless download capability. This allows you to download images and videos from your camera directly to your computer, via the Internet. Some special trail-camera networks will actually allow you to connect all of your cameras to a mobile device and will automatically send an email or text with the latest photos at a regular interval of your choice. Frequently Asked Questions Trail cameras really have only been around since the early 80s and sprang out of the need for students at Missouri State University to more accurately gather data on whitetail deer behavior ( 3 ). Since then, cameras have advanced rapidly, and there are a lot of technical terms used to describe their capability. This "Frequently Asked Questions" section will familiarize you with some of those important terms. What is the definition of ‘trigger speed’? Trigger speed is defined as the amount of time it takes a camera to record a photo once it has detected motion. When it comes to choosing a trail camera, it is widely accepted that faster is better. What do you mean by ‘recovery time’? Recovery time references the time that it takes a camera to reset for another shot after it has taken a photo or photo burst. These times can range greatly from camera to camera, but slower usually means missing those vital snapshots of bucks trailing a doe. What is ‘No-Glow’? When speaking about the flash capability of a trail camera, No Glow flash emits no visible light at all in order to eliminate the possibility of scaring game away. Cameras with No Glow flash produce only black and white nighttime photos, but they can also be extremely useful in home security. This flash type is sometimes also called ‘Black Infrared’ or ‘Black Flash’. What is the definition of ‘flash range’? Flash range is the distance a subject can be from the camera and still be illuminated by the flash. Generally, a higher flash range will yield more accurate scouting data. What size SD card do I need for storage? This answer really depends on the camera you purchase and the specific settings you end up programming on that camera. It’s important to recognize that high-megapixel photos require a lot of storage space. For example, a 32GB SD card can hold more than 11,000 8-megapixel photos but will only hold about 4,000 22-megapixel photos. This is a stark difference. Also, make sure the camera you buy can accommodate the size of SD card you’re looking into. Some may not be compatible with a larger capacity card. In general, though, it is recommended to utilize only Class 10 ( 4 ) cards for optimal performance. Summary A quality trail camera will give you what most hunters crave: vital scouting information about the game in your region and how they’re traveling. It will make your hunts that much more successful because you won’t spend the first half of the trip collecting that data you already have. We hope you’ve found this information useful and we wish you happy hunting in the pursuit of the right trail camera for you.

Summary

Since 1959, the US Air Force has been using the AR-7 as a survival rifle for pilots.   We loved the idea behind the AR-7 so we decided to put it through the paces at SurvivalCache to see if it would live up to the term “Survival Rifle”…and it did. Quick Navigation The AR-7 Shooting: SurvivalCache Video Review of the AR-7 Features: Overall: Changes The AR-7 Let me start off by saying that the AR-7 by Henry Repeating Arms would not be my first choice of a SHTF survival gun.